Sunday, May 22, 2011

HORSETRIPPING STILL LEGAL IN NEVADA, NO TIME TO LOSE. STATE CHAMPIONSHIP HORSETRIPPING SCHEDULED 6/4/11. NEVADA NEEDS A BAN NOW.




















































Let's thank Nevada's senate committee members for listening to us and hearing us and NOT passing AB 329.  We did our part; they did theirs, and that is the beauty and art of our American political system.   





















(Some of the Nevada senators' contact information is at the bottom of this post.)

       Now, Nevada needs to follow through with the ban on the coldblooded practice of horse tripping, called Charreada, practiced in Mexican rodeo.   A rope is thrown around the front legs of a (frightened) running horse (or the back legs, depending on which event), and tightened, and of course the horse goes down hard.  Young mares are used.  Horse tripping has already been banned in 11 states and is its own nightmare with no legitmate reason.


Nevada became afraid their calf roping would be attacked, so they dropped the bill but are considering bringing it back because they realize the Charreada supporters lied (they stated the horses don't "go down"; can you believe it? ).  Tell them you want to see horse tripping banned, please.

Here is recent video taken in Nevada at a Charreada event.  WARNING:  It is hard to watch.  I think this is some of the most egregious stuff I've ever seen, but thankfully they all get up.  Anyone who reads this blog or follows my work knows I cry all the time; what else is new?   I could really have done without the music, though.  Keep the sound down.  I cry with you...and then we push and push and we shut it DOWN.  Okay?
And this little filly was hotshotted in the face.  They used a hotshot indiscriminantly at this event; I've seen other footage which I hope to obtain. Unbelievable.  "Get out the cannon, Maude, there's a fly in the house."  All he wanted her to do was to back up.  It was so uncalled for.   Those who use a hotshot have no horse handling skills.
Let it make you sad, then let it make you mad enough to send firm but civil emails, please, and call lawmakers, and tell your friends.  America is about pressure politics, so let's keep the pressure on and WE WILL STOP THIS MADNESS.  And pray, seriously, for the people doing this; they just don't get it.  So scary.










       (Emails of some Nevada senators are at the bottom of this post.)
One thing:  Proponents of this brutal practice tried to tell me I was "racist" because I am opposed to this brutality.  My revulsion (and many thousands of others') at this "horse tripping" practice, which tears your heart out when you watch it, has nothing to do with any ethnicity or skin.  It's cruelty and abuse, straight up.

Here is a letter from Dr. Pat Haight, a long-time Arizona horse advocate who has been tremendously effective in protecting wild horses and rescuing and rehabilitating many.  She has written the Nevada legislature the following letter.
From: Dr. Pat Haight <pathaight@yahoo.com>
Subject: Personal experience with horses used in horsetripping events: Please ban
To: 
jlee@sen.state.nv.usmroberson@sen.state.nv.usdrhoads@sen.state.nv.usmmanendo@sen.state.nv.usdparks@sen.state.nv.us
Date: Friday, May 20, 2011, 5:26 P.M




Dear Legislator,

We have two mares in the Conquistador Equine Rescue and Advocacy Program (CERAP) who were used in Charros and sustained severe, lifelong injuries from horse tripping. CERAP is a nonprofit registered 501c3 equine welfare organization based in Phoenix, Arizona.

I also worked with Phoenix City Councilwoman Thelda Williams to successfully have horse tripping banned in Arizona.  There has been no problem with the ban affecting any other rodeo events including roping or team penning nor has it affected any movie filming in Arizona in anyway.

At this time CERAP has two young mares who were used in the Charros in horse-tripping.  Both have very serious injuries and will require lifelong corrective shoeing, injections and other care.

One is La Pachanga II who came to us recently.  Pachanga II is an exceptionally good Peruvian Paso mare whose former custodian allowed someone to use Pachanga in the Charros where she sustained an injury to her pastern, the ligament behind her pastern and to her 
suspensory ligament.  Pachanga is only 11 years old, was a show horse and the great granddaughter of the famous Peruvian champion HNS Domingo.  Pachanga will stay with us.  I am attaching pictures so that you can see how beautiful a mare these people damaged.  Pachanga also was a wonderful trail horse and worked with special needs children until she was injured.
La Pachanga II
The second mare is with our board member Wendy Hart in Colorado.  Her name is Meira.  Meira also sustained serious injuries from horse tripping and will need lifelong care.  Meira is only 8 years old, a very good and wonderful quarter horse, gentle and kind and there was nothing else wrong with either of these mares.  Wendy and Meira take naps together.  

Phoenix City Councilwoman Thelda Williams helped me get horse tripping banned in 
Arizona.  If she could be of help, I think Thelda would be happy to speak with you. There were concerns about the ban interfering with other rodeo events and movie filming in Arizona too but there has been no problem with that in Arizona at all.

The stories of La Pachanga II and Meira are on our website if they would be of help to you.  The website link is:  
www.conquistadorprogram.org.  I also am attaching a more detailed account of the injuries to La Pachanga II and Meira sustained in these Charro events.

Veterinarian Dr. Julie Lucas of Southwest Equine Medical and Surgical Center in Phoenix, Arizona testified before the Phoenix City Council regarding the severity of the injuries sustained by horses in horse tripping events.  She described cases in which the jaw of the horse was shoved through the skull because the weight of the horse combined with the speed at which the horse is tripped can cause injuries this severe and fatal.  I have had personal experience with the severe and lifelong leg injuries.

Please vote for a ban on horse tripping in Nevada.

Thank you so much.

Best wishes,

Dr. Pat Haight
(480) 430-4011
Patricia Haight, Ph.D.
The Conquistador Equine Rescue and Advocacy Program
A 501c3 Equine Welfare Organization
www.conquistadorprogram.org

"Gypsy gold does not chink and glitter. It gleams in the sun and neighs in the dark." Gypsy saying
Nevadans, here once again is opportunity and need for your strong voices.  You might like to know, and pass on to your legislators, that Texas is one of the 11 states with a horse tripping ban.  


The Houston rodeo is the largest grossing rodeo in the country, and the ban has not negatively impacted them at all.  This is the kind of reassurance Nevada needs, particularly related to the Reno Rodeo, and Dr. Pat Haight's letter is clear on this point.    


It is important for us to recognize that people outside Nevada do not have a claim on this in the same way we had a claim about use of our public lands and care of our much-loved national heritage species, the wild horses and burros. 


This is a Nevada issue, but Americans and visitors from other countries who love wild horses can certainly write and/or call Nevada's legislators and say you will take your vacations elsewhere because you would rather support another state that doesn't allow horse tripping as a "sport" if those are your thoughts.    Here is their contact information:


      Here is a cut-and-paste email line to all of the below senators:   



         Senator John Lee                   jlee@sen.state.nv.us    
775/684-1424 (work)     
702/258-5447  (home)
Senator Michael Roberson    mroberson@sen.state.nv.us  
775/684-1481  (work)
702/612-6929  (home)

Senator Dean Rhoads           drhoads@sen.state.nv.us  
775/684-1447  (work)
775/756-6582  (home)
Senator Mark Manendo        mmanendo@sen.state.nv.us      
775/684-6503  (work)                                                                                           



        775/451-8654   (home)
Senator David Parks              dparks@sen.state.nv.us   
775/684-6504  (work)
702/736-6929  (home)






























LET'S GET THIS BANNED IN NEVADA







For all the horses and burros, captive and free,







Elyse Gardner


3 comments:

  1. The BLM's endorsement of this so called sport speaks volumes to their lack of consciousness or concern for the welfare of these equines.
    -Katia Louise

    ReplyDelete
  2. Elyse, you probably are already on top of this...from Laura Leigh's website, ART AND HORSES. How can we all help to get this Bill passed?

    Not over yet.
    2062011

    This Bill has been put on the list for resurrection. It does not mean it has passed.

    Early next week will know for sure.

    Prayers.


    Nevadans call Sandoval… If the session needs to be extended to get through the list before it closes… Sandoval is the only one that can do it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Cathleen Doyle
    California Equine Council
    P.O. Box 40000
    Studio City, CA 91614
    Phone: (818) 771-0702
    E-mail: savethehorse@earthlink.net

    To provide a tax-deductible donation to provide food and veterinary care to horses rescued from charreadas, contact:

    Equus Sanctuary
    P.O. Box 3273
    Glendale, CA 91221

    Of the California Equine Council’s achievement, Doyle says “We were only successful once we got the law enforcement and horse industries on our side. The first year, the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association, cattle industry and state farm bureau opposed our bill. They saw mostly animal welfare groups behind, and so they were afraid they'd eventually have to give up the calf-roping too.” Therefore the second year, the California Veterinary Medical Association co-sponsored the bill with Doyle’s group. Many other groups endorsed the bill such as California breeder’s associations, racing federation, police and sheriff council, district attorney's association -- even the Mexican American Chamber of Commerce and the United Steel Workers of America. “With this much support, the bill had to pass,” Doyle says. “Illinois and New Mexico banned horse-tripping using that same strategy.”

    1 María-Cristina García, “Charrería,” The Handbook of Texas Online, 23 Jul. 2002.
    2 Kline, Chris. Mexico's charros are a breed apart. Cnn.com. Available [online]: http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/9705/04/mexico.charros/. Accessed 09 Jan 2004.
    3 Kit Paraventi, “Horse Conversations: A Visit to the Equus Sanctuary,” Animal News, 1998
    4 Cuff, Denis. Mexican rodeo tradition under fire. Contra Costa Times. 7 August, 2004. Available from http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/news/9344077.htm. Accessed 13 August 2004.
    5 Eric Mills, Why Rodeo. Animal Issues, Vol. 33, No. 1, Spring 2002.

    ReplyDelete